Regular contraception

Types of regular contraception

The morning after pill is not a regular method of contraception. Therefore, after using the morning after pill it makes good sense to think whether a regular contraceptive method is appropriate for you.

If you have had a problem with your usual contraceptive methods, this might be a good time to consider a change of contraception, so you can use a method that suits you better.

You have lots of contraceptive choices: barrier methods, hormonal contraceptive methods, IUD and sterilisation.  Remember, contraception is not 100% effective so if you do have an accident, such as a split condom, it’s important that you take the morning after pill.

Speak to a healthcare professional for advice of the most suitable regular contraception options for you.

Some methods are shown below.

Male condom
Male condom

What is it?

A thin sheath rolled onto an erect penis before sex. Forms a barrier that stops sperm (and sexually transmitted infections) getting into your body

How often?

Use every time you have sex

Female condom
Female condom

What is it?

A sheath or pouch inserted into the vagina before sex. Forms a barrier that stops sperm (and sexually transmitted infections) getting into your body

How often?

Use every time you have sex

Cap and diaphragm
Cap and diaphragm

What is it?

Round latex or silicon domes that block the cervix. Need to be used with spermicide

How often?

Put in every time you have sex (but can be done hours ahead of time)

"The Pill"

What is it?

Hormone tablets. If you wish to start or continue using hormonal contraception, you can do so after using ellaOne®, however, you should be advised to use a reliable barrier method until the next menstrual period.

How often?

Once a day, everyday

Contraceptive Injection
Contraceptive Injection

What is it?

An injection of a contraceptive hormone

How often?

One injection every three months

Sponge
Sponge

What is it?

A round piece of white plastic foam that blocks the cervix and releases spermicide

How often?

Put in every time you have sex (but can be done hours ahead of time)

Patch
Patch

What is it?

A thin hormonal ‘sticker’

How often?

Patch changed once a week

Intrauterine device
Intrauterine device

What is it?

A T-shaped device that is inserted in the womb. Two types: hormonal or copper

How often?

It’s inserted once and lasts for between 3 and 10 years depending on the type

Ring
Ring

What is it?

Small bendable hormonal ring that goes in the vagina

How often?

Insert ring. Wait 3 weeks. Remove ring. Wait 1 week. Repeat.

Contraceptive Implant
Contraceptive Implant

What is it?

A small rod inserted in the upper arm which releases hormones

How often?

Quick insertion and lasts for up to 3 years

Sterilisation
Sterilisation

What is it?

Men or women can have the tubes that carry sperm or eggs closed or blocked.

How often?

Sterilisation is a permanent method of contraception. It is difficult to reverse.

Spermicides
Spermicides

What is it?

Creams, films, foams, gels and suppositories that are inserted into the vagina. They work best with other barrier methods

How often?

Must apply every time you have sex

Some of these methods may have medical contraindications. For comprehensive information on contraceptive methods, talk to a healthcare professional.

Remember that only condoms protect you from sexually transmitted infections , including HIV. Other methods of contraception do not offer any protection. If you are worried about sexually transmitted infections, talk to a healthcare professional.

There are also several other “natural methods” such as withdrawal and fertility awareness methods (Ogino method, Billings and temperature method). These methods have been shown to be unreliable.